Child-on-Child Abuse: Why it’s Different When it’s Kids

Most children are loving and kind. But some are taught to treat others as objects.

 

Child-on-child abuse is a very difficult subject. One that few people want to talk about, and fewer people even want to acknowledge. Why? Because it’s uncomfortable, and it puts into sharp focus the fact that even children are capable of doing terrible things that are damaging to others. When it’s your child perpetrating the actions, you’re often horrified and embarrassed, unsure of what to do next. When your child is the victim, you’re worried that what happened will be minimized, or dismissed, and no one will believe you. But child on child abuse is a very real problem today.

 

Child-on-child abuse is handled differently from adult-on-child abuse

 

When the perpetrator is an adult, the solution is clear cut: call the cops, explain what happened, and they’ll be arrested and taken away. Problem solved. But when it’s a child abusing or molesting other kids, or ‘child-on-child abuse’ as it’s sometimes called, how should it be handled? You can’t just put a child in jail, or convict them of a crime and send them to prison. It certainly can’t be swept under the rug or ignored, but it can’t be handled in the same way. So what happens next?

 

A current Michigan case highlights this issue

 

Less than a week ago in Battle Creek, a story broke in the news about three boys, aged 11 to 13, who are accused of sexually assaulting two younger boys in a garage which they are suspected of later burning down to destroy evidence. The victims, aged 6 and 8, told their mothers about the assaults on June 12, the day of the fire, but police suspect that there are other victims out there that we simply don’t know about yet.

 

What is going to happen to the three boys accused of sexual assault?

 

The three boys are currently being held at the Calhoun County Juvenile Home. They’re being charged with juvenile First Degree Criminal Sexual Conduct charges, which is still a very serious crime under Michigan law, despite being a “juvenile” crime. In Michigan, juvenile crimes are handled by the Family Court system, and the penalties tend to be focused more on rehabilitation rather than punishment. That doesn’t mean, however, that the consequences won’t be severe.

 

Defending children against abuse charges requires finesse and skill

A full third of sexual abuse is caused by people under the age of 18. At The Kronzek Firm, our skilled abuse and neglect defense attorneys understand exactly what’s at stake in child on child sexual abuse cases. We have decades of experience in successfully defending a client’s rights, and winning. With many years of combined courtroom experience with juvenile and criminal defense, we have the knowledge, resources, and strategy you need in tough times like this. Call 866 766 5245 today and talk to someone who can help.